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Can People ‘Like Me’ Go to College? Inequality and Dreams of Higher Ed

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The cost of college may be on the rise, but most still agree that it’s a sound investment. There are, in fact, a number of personal and societal benefits associated with getting a bachelor’s degree and, it seems, people know that: Over 90 percent of Americans – across all races and socioeconomic statuses – aspire to attend college.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 16, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Loneliness Contributes to Self-Centeredness for Sake of Self-Preservation

Research conducted over more than a decade indicates that loneliness increases self-centeredness and, to a lesser extent, self-centeredness also increases loneliness.

The findings by researchers at the University of Chicago show such effects create a positive feedback loop between the two traits: As increased loneliness heightens self-centeredness, the latter then contributes further to enhanced loneliness.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 9, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

U.S. Handgun Ownership Motivated by Two Main Forces

New psychological theoretical framework suggest U.S. handgun ownership motivated by combination of fear of crime and a general sense that the world is an unpredictable dangerous place.

How Many Atheists are There? It's Complicated

Using a subtle, indirect measurement technique, psychology researchers have found that there are probably a lot more atheists (people who don't believe in God) in the U.S. than show up in telephone polls.

Research on "Sexual Afterglow" Shows the Lingering Benefits of Sex

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By Andrea Meltzer

Sex is a defining feature of romantic relationships. From an evolutionary perspective, sex is essential for reproduction. Without it, the human species would die off. But some researchers have proposed that sex has a secondary function in humans and other animals whose offspring benefit from the presence of both parents—sex facilitates pair bonding and thus functions to keep couples happily together over time.

A Suspicious Mind Leads to a Suspicious Face

In a series of studies, social psychology researchers show that Black participants who hold suspicious views of Whites visualize White faces, even smiling ones, as less trustworthy, less authentic and sometimes more hostile. The authors suggest there are some potential advantages to these biases, as well as drawbacks.  The results are published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.

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