You are here

Exercising Helps Us Bounce Back From Stress

Image of group of men and women exercising using weighted balls

We all know, or have at least heard the rumors, that exercise is good for us. There’s this intuition that says when we get moving we’ll feel mentally or emotionally stronger, quicker, and better. Research shows that regular exercisers do tend to report less depressed and anxious mood. Moreover, there are encouraging clinical trials showing that when people who have mood and anxiety disorders engage in exercise programs, they tend to have better mental health outcomes. But why?

Supportive Relationships Linked to Willingness to Pursue Opportunities

Research on how our social lives affects decision-making has usually focused on negative factors like stress and adversity. Less attention, however, has been paid to the reverse: What makes people more likely to give themselves the chance to succeed? 

Psychologists Go to War

Featured Image

One hundred years ago, on April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I by declaring war on Germany. When American psychologists heard the news, they dispatched Robert M. Yerkes, then president of the American Psychological Association, to Canada to confer with Carl C.

Arts Engagement Can Help Counter Divisions in Society

Engagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research co-ordinated by psychologists at the University of Kent shows.

The study  provides evidence that the arts can act as a key social psychological catalyst that can foster and maintain social co-operation.

Overcoming the Biases That Come Between Us

Featured Image

Elvis counsels, “Before you abuse, criticize, and accuse … walk a mile in my shoes.” Dylan wishes, “For just one time, you could stand inside my shoes.” Paul McCartney asks us once again to try to see it his way. If you are The King, a Nobel laureate, or a knight—not to mention a rock star—perhaps it is reasonable to expect that everyone else should take your perspective. For the rest of us, if we hope that “we can work it out,” it seems vital for us to try harder and try smarter to understand others—especially these days.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 28, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Community Bias Predicts Police Use of Lethal Force

Averaging the implicit bias of hundreds of thousands of individuals to understand how “biased” a community is, predicts the likelihood of African Americans being killed by police.

The racial biases of Whites in a community predict how many African-Americans are killed by police in a given area, according to results of a paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

How We Think About Our Past Experiences Affects How We Can Help Others

Image of young woman holding coffee cup looking out of a window

Have you ever told a friend experiencing a troubling situation “I know exactly how you feel”?

This empathic response is usually driven by a connection we’ve made with our own similar experiences. Having “been there”, we believe we know what it’s like to be them. But do we really?

Psychologists Say Our ‘Attachment Style’ Applies to Social Networks Like Facebook

LAWRENCE — A new investigation appearing this week in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin suggests a strong association between a person’s attachment style — how avoidant or anxious people are in their close relationships — and their perception and management of social networks like Facebook.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 21, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Pages