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The Healthiest Eaters Are the Most Culturally "Fit"

How to be a healthy eater depends on culture. A recent study shows that in the U.S. and Japan, people who fit better with their culture have healthier eating habits. The results appear in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Who Knows the Impressions One Conveys?

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By Peter Borkenau

People hold beliefs about how others perceive them. For example, whether people see them as attractive, intelligent, and polite. These beliefs may or may not accurately reflect the impression that the person actually conveys, called meta-accuracy.

Embodying Power? More Evidence That Power Posing Does Little to Alter the Intrapsychic Experience of Power

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By Katie Garrison & Brandon Schmeichel

People communicate information to others through a variety of nonverbal displays—for example, standing tall and erect can display confidence. However, such nonverbal displays may also communicate information to oneself. 

Cognitive Ability Varies, but Prejudice is Universal

When it comes to prejudice, it does not matter if you are smart or not, or conservative or liberal, each group has their own specific biases. In a recent study, psychologists show that low cognitive ability (i.e., intelligence, verbal ability) was not a consistent predictor of prejudice. Cognitive ability, whether high or low, only predicts prejudice towards specific groups. The results are published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

LGBT Equality Doesn’t Exist – But Here’s How to Fight For It

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By David Miller

When I came out as gay in my sophomore year of college, I absolutely loved going to Tigerheat – a kitschy 18-and-over gay club in Los Angeles. I mostly remember my nights there as frivolous fun, but they also had deeper meaning. That’s where I first learned how to openly and unabashedly celebrate being gay.

Timing Matters: Patterns of Emotion Dynamics Between Mothers and Children During Adolescence

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By Alexandra Main

Adolescence is a time period when a children’s relationships with their parents can undergo transformations that increase conflict and negative emotion (Laursen & Collins, 2009). To better understand how these conflicts are managed, my colleagues and I analyzed the emotion dynamics—i.e., the patterns of emotional exchange between parents and adolescents—during conflict discussions.

Agreeable Personalities are More Likely to Help Strangers

Prosocial behaviors, such as willingness to help others, may be linked to specific personalities.  Based on new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, agreeableness is one of the better predictors of prosocial behavior.

An Open Letter to NPR's Invisibilia about "The Personality Myth"

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A recent podcast from NPR's Invisbilia garnered attention from many current personality psychology researchers.  Below is one of the many responses to the creators of the podcast generated on both Facebook and Twitter.

Dear Invisibilia,

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