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Want to be Popular? Work on Your Emotional Intelligence

New research shows that in social settings, narcissists start out strong, but it’s those with high emotional intelligence that win the popularity race. Psychology researchers from Poland, the U.K., Germany and the U.S. collaborated on the study appearing in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (PSPB), an official journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

The Bittersweet Taste of Revenge

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By Fade R. Eadeh, Stephanie A. Peak, & Alan J. Lambert

From the biblical mention of an “eye for an eye” to Inigo Montoya’s desire to avenge his father in The Princess Bride, the act of revenge has captured the interest of humans for quite some time. Given the longstanding history of this topic, one might reason that scientific research has arrived at a consensus on the emotional consequences of revenge. Yet, the emotional ramifications from revenge are fairly complex and are often times contradictory.

Strength of One’s Mexican Identity Is Linked to Political Ideology

New research suggests a significant relationship between Latino identity and political ideology. The study, led by a Nevada State College (NSC) psychologist, found that U.S. born Mexicans who were less strongly identified with their Mexican heritage were less liberal in their political ideology. Mexican-Americans and more broadly, Latinos, are the fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S. and an important voting demographic.

Trusting Groups: Size Matters

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By Stephen La Macchia

How do you decide whether to approach a group of strangers for help, whether to sign a contract with one company or another, or whether to be fully honest about your abilities and interests when answering questions from a job interview panel?

There are a range of everyday interactions in which an individual must make decisions about how much to trust a group of people. These decisions are sometimes based on limited information and made with little or no previous contact with the group. So how do we decide whether the group is trustworthy?

Friendships, Vaccines, and Impressions: Upcoming Studies in SPPS

 

While many scientists explore what people have in common, several studies publishing online to Social Psychological and Personality Science show us how differences help us understand individuals.

The company you keep: Personality and friendship characteristics, Michael Laakasuo; Anna Rotkirch, Venla Berg, Markus Jokela

Thinking and Feeling In Judging Others

By Alexander Danvers

You’re interviewing a stranger for a job, and while you have “the facts” about their previous job history in front of you, what you’re not sure about is their emotional state. Are they anxious? Excited? Bored?

Freaks, Geeks, Norms and Mores: Why People Use the Status Quo as a Moral Compass

By Christina Tworek

The Binewskis are no ordinary family. Arty has flippers instead of limbs; Iphy and Elly are Siamese twins; Chick has telekinetic powers. These traveling circus performers see their differences as talents, but others consider them freaks with “no values or morals.” However, appearances can be misleading: The true villain of the Binewski tale is arguably Miss Lick, a physically “normal” woman with nefarious intentions.

When You Don't Feel Valued in a Relationship, Sleep Suffers

We spend up to one-third of our life asleep, but not everyone sleeps well. For couples, it turns out how well you think your partner understands and cares for you is linked to how well you sleep.  The results are published in Social Personality and Psychological Science.

“Our findings show that individuals with responsive partners experience lower anxiety and arousal, which in turn improves their sleep quality,” says lead author Dr. Emre Selçuk, a developmental and social psychologist at Middle East Technical University in Turkey.

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