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Do People Like Government ‘Nudges’? Study Says: Yes

Image of a yellow post-it note on a blank notebook page that reads "Do the right thing"

On Oct. 9, Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago won the Nobel Prize for his extraordinary, world-transforming work in behavioral economics. In its press release, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences emphasized that Thaler demonstrated how nudging – or influencing people while fully maintaining freedom of choice – “may help people exercise better self-control when saving for a pension, as well in other contexts.”

In terms of Thaler’s work on what human beings are actually like, that’s the tip of the iceberg – but it’s a good place to start.

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology Reaffirms its Stance against Harassment

Washington, DC - Recent news, in conjunction with the #MeToo campaign, reminds us as a professional society that we need to do everything we can to ensure that SPSP-linked events adhere to our values and policies.

Friends with unexpected benefits – working with buddies can improve performance

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We routinely work together with other people. Often, we try to achieve shared goals in groups, whether as a team of firefighters or in a scientific collaboration. When working together, many people – naturally – would prefer doing so with others who are their friends. But, as much as we like spending time with our friends, is working with them in a group really good for our performance?

Attitudes to Same-Sex Marriage Have Many Psychological Roots, and They Can Change

Image of two wedding bands tied together on a horizontal line of string

As the Australian same-sex marriage debate heats up it may be time for cool reflection on the sources of our polarised views. Recent research shines a revealing light on the roots of pro- and anti-marriage equality sentiment. It helps explain the roots of our attitudes to same-sex marriage, and whether they are shallow enough to allow attitudes to change.

SPSP Expresses Concern Over NIH Basic Research Category

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) joins with other scientific societies and psychology departments to “share our concerns that basic science research is being redefined as

Healthy Choices are Neither Good or Bad; Only Thinking Makes Them So

Illustration of healthy foods combining to create a brain

Doing healthy things can feel like a battle between the angel on one shoulder and the devil on the other. The devil impels me to order the bacon burger for lunch, but the angel nudges my hand toward the salad.

“Work-Life Balance” and “Empathizing” Do Not Explain Women’s Career Choices

Image of young professional woman working in a home office

A viral letter by then-Google employee James Damore has renewed the conversation about diversity in Silicon Valley. One thread of the ensuing debate has focused on the scientific validity of Damore’s claims that men and women do in fact differ in their preferences. An unspoken assumption has been that differences in preferences—if such differences exist—would go a long way toward explaining why women have remained underrepresented in tech and similar fields, despite efforts to increase diversity.

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