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How to Combat Racial Bias: Start in Childhood

Image of young children's faces

Racial bias can seem like an intractable problem. Psychologists and other social scientists have had difficulty finding effective ways to counter it – even among people who say they support a fairer, more egalitarian society. One likely reason for the difficulty is that most efforts have been directed toward adults, whose biases and prejudices are often firmly entrenched.

In The Blink of an Eye: People Perceive Sex Ratio and Threat of Group in Less Than a Second

In almost as quickly as it takes to blink an eye, we make assumptions about a group of people. New research from UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shows people perceive the sex ratio of a group, and decide if the group is threatening or not, in half a second. The perceptions of the number of men in the group are accurate, according to the research.

Nicholas Alt (UCLA), Brianna Mae Goodale (UCLA), David J Lick (New York University) and Kerri Johnson (UCLA) conducted the research. The results appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Are Men Seen as ‘More American’ Than Women?

Image of men and women standing in front of an American flag

Women make up 50.8 percent of the U.S. population and have equal voting rights, yet are politically underrepresented. The country has never had a female president or vice president. Only 3.5 percent of Supreme Court justices have been women, and women make up only 20 percent of Congress.

Do People Like Government ‘Nudges’? Study Says: Yes

Image of a yellow post-it note on a blank notebook page that reads "Do the right thing"

On Oct. 9, Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago won the Nobel Prize for his extraordinary, world-transforming work in behavioral economics. In its press release, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences emphasized that Thaler demonstrated how nudging – or influencing people while fully maintaining freedom of choice – “may help people exercise better self-control when saving for a pension, as well in other contexts.”

In terms of Thaler’s work on what human beings are actually like, that’s the tip of the iceberg – but it’s a good place to start.

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology Reaffirms its Stance against Harassment

Washington, DC - Recent news, in conjunction with the #MeToo campaign, reminds us as a professional society that we need to do everything we can to ensure that SPSP-linked events adhere to our values and policies.

Friends with unexpected benefits – working with buddies can improve performance

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We routinely work together with other people. Often, we try to achieve shared goals in groups, whether as a team of firefighters or in a scientific collaboration. When working together, many people – naturally – would prefer doing so with others who are their friends. But, as much as we like spending time with our friends, is working with them in a group really good for our performance?

Attitudes to Same-Sex Marriage Have Many Psychological Roots, and They Can Change

Image of two wedding bands tied together on a horizontal line of string

As the Australian same-sex marriage debate heats up it may be time for cool reflection on the sources of our polarised views. Recent research shines a revealing light on the roots of pro- and anti-marriage equality sentiment. It helps explain the roots of our attitudes to same-sex marriage, and whether they are shallow enough to allow attitudes to change.

SPSP Expresses Concern Over NIH Basic Research Category

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) joins with other scientific societies and psychology departments to “share our concerns that basic science research is being redefined as

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