You are here

Overcoming the Biases That Come Between Us

Featured Image

Elvis counsels, “Before you abuse, criticize, and accuse … walk a mile in my shoes.” Dylan wishes, “For just one time, you could stand inside my shoes.” Paul McCartney asks us once again to try to see it his way. If you are The King, a Nobel laureate, or a knight—not to mention a rock star—perhaps it is reasonable to expect that everyone else should take your perspective. For the rest of us, if we hope that “we can work it out,” it seems vital for us to try harder and try smarter to understand others—especially these days.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 28, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Community Bias Predicts Police Use of Lethal Force

Averaging the implicit bias of hundreds of thousands of individuals to understand how “biased” a community is, predicts the likelihood of African Americans being killed by police.

The racial biases of Whites in a community predict how many African-Americans are killed by police in a given area, according to results of a paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

How We Think About Our Past Experiences Affects How We Can Help Others

Image of young woman holding coffee cup looking out of a window

Have you ever told a friend experiencing a troubling situation “I know exactly how you feel”?

This empathic response is usually driven by a connection we’ve made with our own similar experiences. Having “been there”, we believe we know what it’s like to be them. But do we really?

Psychologists Say Our ‘Attachment Style’ Applies to Social Networks Like Facebook

LAWRENCE — A new investigation appearing this week in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin suggests a strong association between a person’s attachment style — how avoidant or anxious people are in their close relationships — and their perception and management of social networks like Facebook.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 21, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

The Paradox of Helping: Endorsing for Others What We Oppose for Ourselves

Featured Image

A homeless person approaches you during the lunch hour, appealing for a few dollars to buy lunch. You are moved to help, but you have a choice—you could either give the person a portion of your own sandwich to eat, or give them cash. Which would you prefer?

Now, consider a second scenario. Your friend approaches you at lunch, also appealing for a few dollars. Would you give to your friend part of your sandwich or the money?

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 14, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

To Attract More Students to STEM, Highlight Communal Aspects of STEM Careers

New research highlights the importance of showing students the communal aspects of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) careers in order to attract more students to STEM classes and careers.

Trump’s Climate Policy May Backfire, as He Unwittingly Plays an Old Psychologists’ Trick

Featured Image

Donald Trump, president of the world’s second greatest emitter of CO₂, has unilaterally withdrawn the US from the Paris climate agreement. The international response has been largely in line with the simple statement from the EU’s climate action commissioner, Miguel Arias Canete, that this was “a sad day for the global community”.

Pages