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From Bullying to Relationships: Mapping Our Online Communications

New Orleans – When we typically think of kids who are the victims of school bullying, what comes to mind are isolated youth who do not fit in. A new study, however, shows that when that harassment occurs online, the victims tend to be in mainstream social groups – and they are often friends or former friends, not strangers.
 
The research is part of a burgeoning field of study into the effects of social media on everyday relationships and behavior.

Charting New Routes for Women at Work: Looking to the Home and Classroom

New Orleans – When mom is the boss at home, she may have a harder time being the boss at work. New research suggests that women, but not men, become less interested in pursuing workplace power when they view that they are in control of decision-making in the home. This shift in thinking affects career choices without women even being aware. 
 
"Women don’t know that they are backing off from workplace power because of how they are thinking about their role at home,” says Melissa Williams of Emory University.

Understanding Personality for Decision-Making, Longevity, and Mental Health

New Orleans – Extraversion does not just explain differences between how people act at social events. How extraverted you are may influence how the brain makes choices – specifically whether you choose an immediate or delayed reward, according to a new study.

The Skills that Make Us a Good Partner Make Us a Good Parent

Being a good partner may make you a better parent, according to a new study. The same set of skills that we tap to be caring toward our partners is what we use to nurture our children, researchers found.
 
The study sought to examine how caregiving plays out in families – "how one relationship affects another relationship,” says Abigail Millings of the University of Bristol, lead author of the work published online this week in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Using Identity to Reduce Own-Race Bias

People often remark that people of a different race "all look alike.” However, when we have trouble recognizing people from another race, it may actually have little to do with the other person's race. Instead, new research finds that that we can improve our memory of members of another race by identifying ourselves as part of the same group.

Studying Couples to Improve Health, Better Relationships

It is not always best to forgive and forget in marriage, according to new research that looks at the costs of forgiveness. Sometimes expressing anger might be necessary to resolve a relationship problem – with the short-term discomfort of an angry but honest conversation benefiting the health of the relationship in the long-term.

A Father's Love is One of the Greatest Influences on Personality Development

A father’s love contributes as much — and sometimes more — to a child's development as does a mother's love.

Fantasizing About Your Dream Vacation Could Lead to Poor Decision-Making

Summer vacation time is upon us. If you have been saving up for your dream vacation for years, you may want to make sure your dream spot is still the best place to go.

Defending the Statue of Liberty: Understanding Militant Responses to Terrorism

The traditional Southern belief that men must defend their honor is alive and well but not just among men. A new study finds that both men and women in the Southern United States believe in responding aggressively – and sometimes in the extreme – to attacks on the nation.
 
In two studies, researchers sought to measure both individual and regional differences in honor ideology in the United States.

How Thinking About Death Can Lead to a Good Life

Thinking about death can actually be a good thing. An awareness of mortality can improve physical health and help us re-prioritize our goals and values, according to a new analysis of recent scientific studies. Even non-conscious thinking about death – say walking by a cemetery – could prompt positive changes and promote helping others.
 
Past research suggests that thinking about death is destructive and dangerous, fueling everything from prejudice and greed to violence.

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