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Awards honor excellence in social and personality psychology

Racial prejudice and stereotyping, pay-what-you-want pricing, cross-cultural training – these are just a few of the research areas of this year's winners of the Society for Personality and Social

SPSP-Initiated Investigation

Last updated: January 7, 2015
 
This page will be updated to include more information as it becomes available.
 

Cialdini Prize

The Robert B. Cialdini Prize is a prize for a single outstanding contribution that recognizes the author(s) of a publication that uses field methods and demonstrates relevance to outside groups. It is designed to recognize the publication that best explicates social psychological phenomena principally through the use of field research methods and settings and that thereby demonstrates the relevance of the discipline to communities outside of academic social psychology within a given year.

Award Info

Description

About the Prize

Started in 2008, the Robert B. Cialdini Prize recognizes the author(s) of a publication that uses field methods and demonstrates relevance to outside groups. It is designed to recognize the publication that best explicates social psychological phenomena principally through the use of field research methods and settings and that thereby demonstrates the relevance of the discipline to communities outside of academic social psychology within a given year.

This prize is intended to encourage work that both uses field methods and settings and has external applicability to outside communities. This prize is not intended for solely laboratory studies that have societal applicability, although reports that incorporate a small number of lab studies in the publication package will not be excluded from consideration if the bulk of the work was completed in the field.

The term “field research methods” is meant to be inclusive of field experiments, and is not limited to correlational or nonexperimental approaches. The term “field research settings” is meant to include naturally-occurring domains in which research participants can expect to find themselves under normal life circumstances and in which they are unlikely to suppose that they are research participants.

Recipients of this prize split a $2400 honorarium and each receive an accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention. Additionally, recipients receive a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. This prize was endowed by Robert Cialdini through the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology.

About Robert Cialdini

Robert CialdiniDr. Robert Cialdini has spent his entire career researching the science of influence earning him an international reputation as an expert in the fields of persuasion, compliance, and negotiation. His books including, Influence: Science & Practice, are the result of decades of peer-reviewed research on why people comply with requests. Influence has sold over 2 million copies, is a New York Times Bestseller and has been published in twenty-seven languages. Because of the world-wide recognition of Dr. Cialdini’s cutting edge scientific research and his ethical business and policy applications, he is frequently regarded as the “Godfather of influence.” Dr. Cialdini received his Ph.D from the University of North Carolina and post doctoral training from Columbia University. He has held Visiting Scholar Appointments at Ohio State University, the University of California, the Annenberg School of Communications, and the Graduate School of Business of Stanford University.  Currently, Dr Cialdini is Regents’ Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University.
 

Career Contribution Award

The Career Contribution Award is a senior career award that honors a scholar who has made major theoretical and/or empirical contributions to social psychology and/or personality psychology or to bridging these areas together. This award may recognize recipients who have been under-recognized for their distinguished scholarly contributions across long and productive careers.

 

Award Info

Description

About the Award

Started in 2011, the Career Contribution Award is a senior career award that honors a scholar who has made major theoretical and/or empirical contributions to social psychology and/or personality psychology or to bridging these areas together. This award may recognize recipients who have been under-recognized for their distinguished scholarly contributions across long and productive careers.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention, plus a three-night hotel stay, are provided.

 

When the Harm Done Can Never Be Balanced: Vicarious Revenge and the Death of Osama Bin Laden

Friday will mark the third anniversary of Osama bin Laden’s assassination, a day when U.S. President Barack Obama famously stated “Justice has been done.” But has it? A new study from a team of social psychology researchers led by Mario Gollwitzer of Philipps University of Marburg, has questioned whether this instance of vicarious revenge led to feelings of satisfaction and reestablished justice within the American public, including whether bin Laden’s assassination ignited craving for more revenge.

Justice achieved

Lucky Charms: When are Superstitions Used Most?

It might be a lucky pair of socks, or a piece of jewelry; whatever the item, many people turn to a superstition or lucky charm to help achieve a goal. For instance, you used a specific avatar to win a game and now you see that avatar as lucky. Superstitions are most likely to occur under high levels of uncertainty. Eric Hamerman at Tulane University and Carey Morewedge at Boston University have determined that people are more likely to turn to superstitions to achieve a performance goal versus a learning goal.

What Can Your Online Avatar Say About Your Personality?

More communication among individuals is occurring online, and often between individuals who do not know each other offline. Researchers at York University are looking to understand the potential impressions and their limitations of those we meet in a digital context. In a study published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin the researchers specifically looked at what personality traits are conveyed by a user's avatar.

Design of the study

The Psychology of Gift-Giving and Receiving

Gift exchanges can reveal how people think about others, what they value and enjoy, and how they build and maintain relationships. Researchers are exploring various aspects of gift-giving and receiving, such as how givers choose gifts, how gifts are used by recipients, and how gifts impact the relationship between givers and receivers.

The symposia "The Psychology of Gift Giving and Receiving" will take place during the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in Long Beach, California.

Challenges of "picky" recipients

Declining Loneliness Among American Teenagers

There has been a growing concern that modern society is increasingly lonely. In 2006, a New York Times article "The Lonely American Just Got a Bit Lonelier" highlighted research that shows a decline in social engagement--people are less likely to join clubs, have fewer close friends, and are less likely to perceive others as trustworthy. However, studies have also shown an increase in extraversion and self-esteem, which suggests loneliness is decreasing.

Liberals Are More Emotion-Driven Than Conservatives

Emotions are powerful motivators of human behavior and attitudes. Emotions also play an important role in guiding policy support in conflict and other political contexts. Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya have studied the interaction between emotion and political ideology, showing that the motivating power of emotions is not the same for those on different ends of the ideological spectrum. Their research is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Design of the study

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