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Service to SPSP Award

The SPSP Award for Distinguished Service to the Society recognizes distinguished service specifically to SPSP.

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The SPSP Award for Distinguished Service to the Society recognizes distinguished service specifically to SPSP. Distinguished service may be in terms of a particular, significant activity that benefited the Society or cumulative contributions, performed over time, to the Society. The Society recognizes that service comes in many forms, and this award expresses the Society's appreciation of distinctive contributions.

Recipients of this award receive a $500 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership.

Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize

The Daniel M. Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize is a prize for a single outstanding contribution that recognizes the author of an article or book chapter judged to provide the most innovative theoretical contribution to social/personality psychology within a given year.

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About the Award

The Daniel M. Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize recognizes the author of an article or book chapter judged to provide the most innovative theoretical contribution to social/personality psychology within a given year. 

Any kind of innovative theoretical contribution can be considered for the prize, including presentations of new theories, new theory-based integrations of disparate areas of inquiry, and significant extensions of existing theories to new areas of inquiry. Theoretical contributions are eligible for the prize regardless of they appear in stand-alone theoretical papers, within conceptually-based literature reviews, or in some other type of article or book chapter in which conceptual innovation is highlighted.

The Wegner prize recognizes theoretical articles that are especially likely to generate the discovery of new hypotheses, new phenomena, or new ways of thinking about the discipline of social/personality psychology. Theoretical contributions may be judged innovative and generative even before they have accumulated substantial empirical support. Therefore, an article may be judged worthy for the prize even if it runs the risk of empirical invalidation in the future. The emphasis of the prize is on a contribution's conceptual innovation and potential to motivate new research and further conceptual investigation, rather than on its current level of empirical support.

Recipients of this award receive a $700 honorarium (split among winning authors) and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. This award was endowed by support from Worth Publishers through the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology.

About Daniel Wegner

Daniel WegnerThe Theoretical Innovation Prize was renamed the Daniel M. Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize in October 2013, honoring the passing of Daniel Wegner--one of the fields most regonized scholars known for his novel theoretical perspective. Wegner studied the role of thought in self-control and in social life.  He investigated thought suppression, finding that people become preoccupied with a white bear when they are asked not to think about it, and he researched mental control of other kind, as well.  He studied transactive memory--how people in groups and relationships remember things cooperatively--and action identification--what people think they're doing. A 1996-1997 Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, he was a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, recipient of the William James Fellow Award from the Association for Psychological Science, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association, and the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. (Source: danwegner.net)

 

Methodological Innovator Award

The Methodological Innovator Award is a senior career award that recognizes an individual who has made a significant or sustained contribution to innovative methods in social and personality psychology across his or her career. The award recognizes contributions that are especially likely to generate the discovery of new hypotheses, new phenomena, or new ways of thinking about the discipline of social/personality psychology.

Award Info

Description

About the Award

The Methodological Innovator Award is a senior career award that recognizes an individual who has made a significant or sustained contribution to innovative methods in social and personality psychology across his or her career. The award recognizes contributions that are especially likely to generate the discovery of new hypotheses, new phenomena, or new ways of thinking about the discipline of social/personality psychology.

Any kind of innovative methodological contribution (including developments of new methods, including analytic methods; innovative applications of existing methods; and creative application of methods from other fields), regardless of the format of the contribution, can be considered as evidence for the award. Contributions by an individual could include articles, papers, book chapters, books, websites, pieces of software or hardware, symposia, or other inventions created or released and judged to be innovative.

The award is made in recognition of a record of sustained contributions in one or several areas. 

Methodological contributions may be judged innovative and generative even before they have generated substantial empirical findings. The emphasis of the award is on a contribution's conceptual innovation and potential to motivate new research and further conceptual investigation.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention are provided, plus a three-night hotel stay. 

 

Distinguished Scholar Award

The Distinguished Scholar Award is a senior career award that recognizes the broad scope and potentially integrative nature of scholarship in personality and social psychology. It honors a scholar who has made distinctively valuable research contributions across his or her career that bridge personality and social psychology or bridge personality or social psychology to another field (ie. law, education, organizations, or medicine). It is intended for individuals whose career contributions are outstanding, but do not fit neatly within the prototypical social or personality research areas.

Award Info

Description

About the Award

Started in 2011, the Distinguished Scholar Award is a senior career award that recognizes the broad scope and potentially integrative nature of scholarship in personality and social psychology. It honors a scholar who has made distinctively valuable research contributions across his or her career that bridge personality and social psychology or bridge personality or social psychology to another field (ie. law, education, organizations, or medicine). It is intended for individuals whose career contributions are outstanding, but do not fit neatly within the prototypical social or personality research areas.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention are provided, plus a three-night hotel stay, and the recipient will give an address in a special plenary session (along with the Block Award and Campbell Award recipients). 

 

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Rare in history are moments like the 1960s civil rights movement, in which members of a majority group vocally support minority groups in their fight against prejudice. New research not only confirms the power of speaking up for those facing prejudice but also underlines the importance of exactly what is communicated. Looking at YouTube video messages, researchers found that homosexual youth found the most comfort in messages that both supported them and advocated social change.
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