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Receiving Gossip About Others Promotes Self-Reflection and Growth

Gossip is pervasive in our society, and our penchant for gossip can be found in most of our everyday conversations. Why are individuals interested in hearing gossip about others’ achievements and failures? Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands studied the effect positive and negative gossip has on how the recipient evaluates him or herself. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Exploring the Connection Between Empathy, Neurohormones and Aggression

Empathy is typically seen as eliciting warmth and compassion—a generally positive state that makes people do good things to others. However, empathy may also motivate aggression on behalf of the vulnerable other. Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo, examined whether assessed or elicited empathy would lead to situation-specific aggression on behalf of another person, and to explore the potential role of two neurohormones in explaining a connection between empathy and aggression. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

A Meta-Analysis of Peer Norms and Their Relation to Adolescent Sexual Behavior

Researchers at Utrecht University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute collaborated on a meta-analysis of research on adolescent sexual behavior. The goal was to analyze how this behavior is related to adolescents' perceptions of three types of sexual peer norms, including how sexually active their peers are, how much their peers would approve of being sexually active, or how much they feel pressured by their peers to have sex.

Can Fiction Stories Make Us More Empathetic?

Empathy is important for navigating complex social situations, and is considered a highly desirable trait. Raymond Mar, a psychologist at York University in Canada, discussed how exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling in his session at the American Psychological Association's 122nd Annual Convention.

Exposure to stories

How We Form Habits and Change Existing Ones

Much of our daily lives are taken up by habits that we've formed over our lifetime. An important characteristic of a habit is that it's automatic-- we don't always recognize habits in our own behavior. Studies show that about 40 percent of people's daily activities are performed each day in almost the same situations. Habits emerge through associative learning. "We find patterns of behavior that allow us to reach goals.

What Does 'Diversity' Mean to You? The Answer May Depend on Your Race

Diversity in the workplace has been a contentious issue for many employers. In May 2014, Google disclosed that 70% of its employees are male, and in terms of racial diversity, the company is 61% White, 30% Asian, 3% Hispanic and 2% Black. Does that breakdown sound diverse to you? If not, what would an ideal diverse team look like? A study publishing in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin sheds light on the complexity in defining diversity.

Campbell Award

The Campbell Award is a senior career award which recognizes distinguished scholarly achievement and sustained excellence in research in social psychology. This award is intended to recognize rigorous research over one's career, rather than one specific discovery or publication.

This award honors an individual who has contributed to the field of social psychology in significant ways. It is not limited by research area or methodological approach to social psychological science.

Award Info

Description

About the Award

First given in 1980, the Donald T. Campbell Award is a senior career award that recognizes distinguished scholarly achievement and sustained excellence in research in social psychology. This award is intended to recognize rigorous research over one's career, rather than one specific discovery or publication.

This award honors an individual who has contributed to the field of social psychology in significant ways. It is not limited by research area or methodological approach to social psychological science.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention are provided, plus a three-night hotel stay, and the recipient will give an address in a special plenary session (along with the Block Award and Distinguished Scholar recipients).

About Donald Campbell

Don CampbellDonald T. Campbell passed away on May 6, 1996, leaving a legacy of high standards for social science inquiry. He was University Professor of Social Relations, Psychology, and Education at Lehigh University until he retired in 1994. Campbell received his A.B. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, and he held teaching positions at Northwestern University, Syracuse University, University of Chicago, and Ohio State University. During his career, he also lectured at Oxford, Harvard, and Yale Universities.
 
He served as president of the American Psychological Association and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Campbell received numerous honorary degrees and awards. He wrote more than 235 articles in the areas of social psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, and philosophy, covering a broad scope of topics from social science methodology to philosophy of science.
 

Block Award

The Block Award is SPSP's senior career award for research accomplishment in personality psychology. It was named for Jack Block, who was known for his analytic and theoretical sophistication and depth, as well as for his broad interests. The recipients of this award are recognized for their scientifically rigorous career research accomplishments in personality psychology rather than for a specific discovery or article. 

Award Info

Description

About the Award

Founded in 2000, the Jack Block Award for Distinguished Research in Personality is a senior career award that honors a researcher for accomplishment in personality psychology. This award is intended to recognize rigorous research over one's career, rather than one specific discovery or publication.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention are provided, plus a three-night hotel stay, and the recipient will give an address in a special plenary session (along with the Campbell Award and Distinguished Scholar recipients).

About Jack Block

Jack BlockA professor of psychology at UC-Berkeley, Jack Block was a pioneer in the theoretical and empirical study of personality. The SPSP Personality Researcher Award was renamed the Jack Block Award upon Block being its first recipient in 2000. Block remained a professor emeritus at UC-Berkeley until his death in 2010.

In addition to his empirical work on personality development, Block was a tireless critic, offering challenges and insights to many of the reigning paradigms in personality psychology. In insightful and rigorous terms, he offered published critiques of the Five Factors Model, the Act-Frequency approach, depressive realism, and response sets. However, Block's most important contribution was the great understanding he provided of personality consistency and stability from early childhood into adulthood. (Source: Spring 2001 dialogue)

 

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