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An Open Letter to NPR's Invisibilia about "The Personality Myth"

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A recent podcast from NPR's Invisbilia garnered attention from many current personality psychology researchers.  Below is one of the many responses to the creators of the podcast generated on both Facebook and Twitter.

Dear Invisibilia,

Prediction in Psychology

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By Alexander Danvers

What do you want out of your social psychology research?

The obvious—and dominant—answer is to explain how the mind works. The statistical methods typically employed by psychologists are set up to answer questions related to cause and effect.

But this is not the only way to approach science—or statistical methodology. In a preprint paper currently under review, researchers Tal Yarkoni and Jacob Westfall suggest that psychologists should shift their emphasis in the direction of prediction.

The Use of Non-Fit Messaging May Improve Patient Choices

When it comes to helping patients make the best choices for themselves, sometimes you have to challenge their usual way of dealing with the world, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

When It Comes To Knowing Your True Self, Believe In Free Will

Diminishing a person’s belief in free will leads to them feeling less like their true selves, according to recent research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science. In a pair of studies, researchers from Texas A&M University manipulated people’s beliefs in free will to see how this would affect the subjects’ sense of authenticity, their sense of self.

Onward and Upward with Psychology

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By Alexander Danvers

The first ever meeting of the Society for Improving Psychological Science (SIPS)—even that name is uncertain—was radically different from a typical psychology conference. Attendees didn’t just learn about new research on how the scientific process can be improved, we worked for three days to try to immediately and tangibly improve psychological science.

Can Being a Good Storyteller Lead to Love?

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By Melanie Green

Everyone loves a good story, but can a good story lead to love?

Rethinking Race Stereotypes

An abandoned buidling with a faded gas sign, and broken windows. The area around the building has a few borwn plants but is mopstly empty and dusty, like a rural dessert

By Keelah Williams, Oliver Sng, and Steven Neuberg

Since the classic “Princeton trilogy” studies began in 1933, social psychologists have assessed and catalogued White Americans’ stereotypes of Black Americans. The value of this work is clear: if we want to reduce the application of pernicious stereotypes to individuals, it’s useful to know what those stereotypes are likely to be.

Faithfulness Is in the Eye of the Beholder: Satisfied Partners Downgrade the Appearance of Potential Threats to Their Romantic Relationship

Though they meet thousands of new people in their lifetime, what underlying psychological factors might couples use to stay committed to their partners? According to a recent study, people in relationships actually see tempting people outside of their partnership as less attractive. This perceptual bias could represent a non-conscious method of self-control that assists in overcoming temptations in order to facilitate long term goals of staying with a romantic partner.

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