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Thinking and Feeling In Judging Others

By Alexander Danvers

You’re interviewing a stranger for a job, and while you have “the facts” about their previous job history in front of you, what you’re not sure about is their emotional state. Are they anxious? Excited? Bored?

Freaks, Geeks, Norms and Mores: Why People Use the Status Quo as a Moral Compass

By Christina Tworek

The Binewskis are no ordinary family. Arty has flippers instead of limbs; Iphy and Elly are Siamese twins; Chick has telekinetic powers. These traveling circus performers see their differences as talents, but others consider them freaks with “no values or morals.” However, appearances can be misleading: The true villain of the Binewski tale is arguably Miss Lick, a physically “normal” woman with nefarious intentions.

When You Don't Feel Valued in a Relationship, Sleep Suffers

We spend up to one-third of our life asleep, but not everyone sleeps well. For couples, it turns out how well you think your partner understands and cares for you is linked to how well you sleep.  The results are published in Social Personality and Psychological Science.

“Our findings show that individuals with responsive partners experience lower anxiety and arousal, which in turn improves their sleep quality,” says lead author Dr. Emre Selçuk, a developmental and social psychologist at Middle East Technical University in Turkey.

Bad Science Evolves. Stopping it Means Changing Institutional Selection Pressures

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By Paul E. Smaldino

Science is awesome, but it ain’t perfect. If you’ve been paying attention to the so-called “crises of reproducibility” in the behavioral, biomedical, and social sciences, you know that false positives and overblown effect sizes appear to be rampant in the published literature.

The Healthiest Eaters Are the Most Culturally "Fit"

How to be a healthy eater depends on culture. A recent study shows that in the U.S. and Japan, people who fit better with their culture have healthier eating habits. The results appear in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Who Knows the Impressions One Conveys?

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By Peter Borkenau

People hold beliefs about how others perceive them. For example, whether people see them as attractive, intelligent, and polite. These beliefs may or may not accurately reflect the impression that the person actually conveys, called meta-accuracy.

Embodying Power? More Evidence That Power Posing Does Little to Alter the Intrapsychic Experience of Power

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By Katie Garrison & Brandon Schmeichel

People communicate information to others through a variety of nonverbal displays—for example, standing tall and erect can display confidence. However, such nonverbal displays may also communicate information to oneself. 

Cognitive Ability Varies, but Prejudice is Universal

When it comes to prejudice, it does not matter if you are smart or not, or conservative or liberal, each group has their own specific biases. In a recent study, psychologists show that low cognitive ability (i.e., intelligence, verbal ability) was not a consistent predictor of prejudice. Cognitive ability, whether high or low, only predicts prejudice towards specific groups. The results are published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.