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SPSP2018

Can Imagining Your Future Improve Your Health?

Illustration of small person turning a gear inside of an open head

People are living longer than ever. For many countries, average life expectancy is predicted to soon exceed 80 years. As a longevity expert put it, “We should be planning for more life.” And of course, this includes maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Gender Diversity Alone Is Not Enough

Image of a business man and business woman interviewing a woman at a table

Today, women are more likely to hold positions of power than they were decades ago. However, female leaders tend to be put under a microscope, facing more scrutiny than their male counterparts.

For example, Marissa Mayer, the CEO of Yahoo, was blamed for the many missteps in the company. As a young woman and a CEO, her social role as a woman and as a CEO may have been in conflict.

This conflict is not unique to Mayer, or even CEOs. Women in positions of power are assumed to immediately help other women come to power—but is that assumption true?

Alice Eagly: An Impressive Legacy

Image of Alice Eagly visiting at her Legacy Award lunch

“Okay, so that’s our world,” said Alice Eagly, The Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) 2018 Annual Convention Legacy honoree, as she explained the broad differences in the division of labor across men and women that persist to this day. Eagly is perhaps best known for her work on how gender stereotypes emerge from the social roles men and women adopt. As Eagly explained, we learn about men and women from how labor is divided.

Coping with Prejudice: Insights From Mindset Research

Illustration of arms extended skyward in protest, holding signs and megaphones

Holding a sign she couldn’t read, Megan Phelps-Roper stood at her first picket line at age 5, and for the next twenty years joined her Westboro Baptist Church family in spreading hate against groups from Catholics to Muslims to LGBT people. To most people, what Phelps-Roper did sounds biased, and it can be tempting to think of her as a irredeemable.

How Do Robots and Humans Interact?

Image of robot in foreground, blurred female in background

To what extent do people place identity with or against robots? Can we take a robot’s perspective? Do we see robots as moral beings?

Xuan Zhao, who studies perspective taking, empathy, and prosocial behaviors, launched the session by highlighting the theoretical and practical relevance of examining human-robot interaction.

How Do Dispositional Tendencies Shape How We Assign Blame?

Illustration of mutlicultural jury

Accidents happen, and when misfortunes occur we tend to look for someone or something to blame.

When such accidents lead to court cases, it often falls upon a jury to determine fault. How does an individual’s attributional tendency impact how they assign blame?

Creating Diverse Schools and Workplaces Requires Inclusion, Not Just Numbers

Atlanta, GA - New research shows when it comes to successfully engaging and including minorities in the workforce and schools, organizations need to focus on inclusion. Several social psychology researchers will share details of their results at the SPSP Annual Convention on March 2nd.

“Institutions tend to overemphasize numerical diversity to the exclusion of inclusion” says Erika Hall (Emory University), one of the presenters and co-chair of the symposium.

Inclusive Businesses

The ‘Great Gatsby’ Curve: Perceptions of Economic Mobility are Caused by Perceptions of Inequality

Illustration of older men and women dancing in a line

In 1931, James Truslow Adams defined the American dream as the idea that “each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.” At present, however, social mobility is remarkably stagnant, with one’s circumstances of birth having a large effect on later social class. Despite this fact, many people overestimate social mobility.

Gendered Beliefs May Make People Assume Sexual Consent

Image of a man and a woman sitting on a bench together in front of a sunset

The sexual double standard (SDS) is a belief that access to sexuality varies by gender. According to SDS, women are expected to be passive “gatekeepers” of sexual activity; men the “initiators.” Women are socially punished for having sex; men are rewarded. In a set of two experiments, Dr. Yuliana Zaikman examined how these gendered stereotypes might influence the way people think about sexual consent.

Emotions, Politics, and the 2016 US Election

Illustrations of various emotions

The 2016 US presidential election brought polarized reactions, both joy and despair, to the forefront. During “Emotions & Politics: The Inextricable Link,” Allison Troy of Franklin and Marshall College and Brett Ford of the University of Toronto discussed people’s predictions about, and reactions to, the strong emotions that resulted from the election of Donald Trump.

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