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Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI December 1, 2017

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In this week's roundup we catch up from the Thanksgiving weekend, with posts on giving, happiness, and persuasion.  Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI September 15, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, email us, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

StudySwap

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By Christopher R. Chartier and Randy McCarthy

The community of research psychologists has access to a large amount of resources (e.g., time, participants, expertise, etc.) which, collectively, has the potential to make enormous gains in knowledge, shape public policy, and improve human lives. However, these resources may not be currently used as efficiently as possible. With these goals in mind, we introduce a new tool to facilitate coordinated use of collective research resources: StudySwap.

In Case You Missed It May 26, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up (May 23rd)

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By Dave Nussbaum

The Need for Power in Psychology

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By David Nussbaum

Two wonderful blog posts this week that you won’t want to miss if you’re interested in questions of statistical power in personality and social psychology. In the first, Simine Vazire (@siminevazire) argues that sample sizes can’t be too large:

you can’t have too large a sample.  there is no ‘double-edged sword’.  there are no downsides to a large sample.  more evidence is always better, and larger samples = more evidence.