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stereotypes

Does biology explain why men outnumber women in tech?

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It’s no secret that Silicon Valley employs many more men than women in tech jobs. What’s much harder to agree on is why.

The recent anti-diversity memo by a now former Google engineer has pushed this topic into the spotlight. The writer argued there are ways to explain the gender gap in tech that don’t rely on bias and discrimination – specifically, biological sex differences. Setting aside how this assertion would affect questions about how to move toward greater equity in tech fields, how well does his wrap-up represent what researchers know about the science of sex and gender?

Community Bias Predicts Police Use of Lethal Force

Averaging the implicit bias of hundreds of thousands of individuals to understand how “biased” a community is, predicts the likelihood of African Americans being killed by police.

The racial biases of Whites in a community predict how many African-Americans are killed by police in a given area, according to results of a paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Showcasing Immigrant Excellence

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By Joel E. Martinez, Lauren A. Feldman, and Mina Cikara

A social-media campaign to counter negative stereotypes shows enormous promise—but it’s still a work in progress

Most Popular Posts of 2016

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As 2016 comes to an end, the editors take a look back at the most read posts of the year. Some are quickly becoming classics, while others tackle new research or cover discussions important to the field. Take a look for yourself. 

 

Real Men Don’t Say “Cute”

Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

Cognitive Ability Varies, but Prejudice is Universal

When it comes to prejudice, it does not matter if you are smart or not, or conservative or liberal, each group has their own specific biases. In a recent study, psychologists show that low cognitive ability (i.e., intelligence, verbal ability) was not a consistent predictor of prejudice. Cognitive ability, whether high or low, only predicts prejudice towards specific groups. The results are published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Rethinking Race Stereotypes

An abandoned buidling with a faded gas sign, and broken windows. The area around the building has a few borwn plants but is mopstly empty and dusty, like a rural dessert

By Keelah Williams, Oliver Sng, and Steven Neuberg

Since the classic “Princeton trilogy” studies began in 1933, social psychologists have assessed and catalogued White Americans’ stereotypes of Black Americans. The value of this work is clear: if we want to reduce the application of pernicious stereotypes to individuals, it’s useful to know what those stereotypes are likely to be.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI November 2, 2018

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On the eve of Election Day, a look at how to be a better voter and the science behind hate speech. See what else you may have missed online.

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What Happens When We Give Everything a Gender

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A few years ago, I had my first conflict with a colleague. It seemed trivial: we were arguing over toys. While it may have seemed like we were acting like the children who play with them, the conversation was much bigger than toys. It was about gender bias and inequality.

How Women and Men’s Different Emotional Experiences Shape Moral Decisions

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Negative stereotypes about women’s emotionality have persisted throughout history, leading to many damaging myths about their decision-making capacities in the social, professional, and political sphere.  Historically, women’s emotionality was also considered to undermine their ability to make moral decisions.  Women were often viewed as morally inferior to men because they based moral judgments on emotion rather than logic.  In stark contrast to this early view, we now know that self-conscious moral emotions, like guilt, are critical to moral judgment and moral behavior (

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