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physical health

Exercising Helps Us Bounce Back From Stress

Image of group of men and women exercising using weighted balls

We all know, or have at least heard the rumors, that exercise is good for us. There’s this intuition that says when we get moving we’ll feel mentally or emotionally stronger, quicker, and better. Research shows that regular exercisers do tend to report less depressed and anxious mood. Moreover, there are encouraging clinical trials showing that when people who have mood and anxiety disorders engage in exercise programs, they tend to have better mental health outcomes. But why?

When Social Status is Bad for Health

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By Cynthia Levine

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

Keep Romance Alive with Double Dates: And Other Ways Perceptions Influence Relationships

Austin -- Going on a double date may be more effective at reigniting passion in your own relationship than the classic candlelit dinner for two. According to new research, striking up a friendship with another couple in which you discuss personal details of your life will bring you closer to your own partner.

Understanding Personality for Decision-Making, Longevity, and Mental Health

New Orleans – Extraversion does not just explain differences between how people act at social events. How extraverted you are may influence how the brain makes choices – specifically whether you choose an immediate or delayed reward, according to a new study.

How Thinking About Death Can Lead to a Good Life

Thinking about death can actually be a good thing. An awareness of mortality can improve physical health and help us re-prioritize our goals and values, according to a new analysis of recent scientific studies. Even non-conscious thinking about death – say walking by a cemetery – could prompt positive changes and promote helping others.
 
Past research suggests that thinking about death is destructive and dangerous, fueling everything from prejudice and greed to violence.