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person perception

Why do People Believe in the “True Self”?

kitten looks in a mirror sees reflection of a tiger
Although intuitively appealing, the belief that each person has a true self may be just a quirk of the human mind.

Wearing Luxury Brands Might Give the Wrong Impression

Luxury Watches
Luxury brands are highly sought-after status symbols, but they may be making you less likeable and employable.

Beyond First Appearances

Two men shaking hands
It takes less than 5 minutes of interacting to improve a first impression.

How to Give Away Your Cake and Eat It Too

Person taking slice of fresh delicious colorful cake at table, top view
Allowing others to distribute resources can increase your chances of getting what you want.

In The Blink of an Eye: People Perceive Sex Ratio and Threat of Group in Less Than a Second

In almost as quickly as it takes to blink an eye, we make assumptions about a group of people. New research from UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shows people perceive the sex ratio of a group, and decide if the group is threatening or not, in half a second. The perceptions of the number of men in the group are accurate, according to the research.

Nicholas Alt (UCLA), Brianna Mae Goodale (UCLA), David J Lick (New York University) and Kerri Johnson (UCLA) conducted the research. The results appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Real Men Don’t Say “Cute”

Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

The Bittersweet Taste of Revenge

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By Fade R. Eadeh, Stephanie A. Peak, & Alan J. Lambert

From the biblical mention of an “eye for an eye” to Inigo Montoya’s desire to avenge his father in The Princess Bride, the act of revenge has captured the interest of humans for quite some time. Given the longstanding history of this topic, one might reason that scientific research has arrived at a consensus on the emotional consequences of revenge. Yet, the emotional ramifications from revenge are fairly complex and are often times contradictory.

Friendships, Vaccines, and Impressions: Upcoming Studies in SPPS

 

While many scientists explore what people have in common, several studies publishing online to Social Psychological and Personality Science show us how differences help us understand individuals.

The company you keep: Personality and friendship characteristics, Michael Laakasuo; Anna Rotkirch, Venla Berg, Markus Jokela

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