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morality

Our Enemies Are Human. That’s Why We Want to Kill Them

Image of two opposing face statues, the left is white the right is red

On Saturday (August 12), James Alex Fields Jr. drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, injuring 30 people and killing Heather Heyer. Earlier that day, white supremacists nearly beat Dre Harris to death. Throughout the afternoon, violence erupted between white supremacists and counter-protesters.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 16, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 9, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

In Case You Missed It March 31, 2017

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets that might be worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Disgust Way of Communicating Moral Motivation

New research carried out by psychologists at the University of Kent has shown for the first time that a decision to express disgust or anger depends on the motives a person seeks to communicate.

Previous studies have suggested that the emotion of disgust originally evolved to protect people from infectious disease; people don’t generally eat rotten meat, crawling with maggots, because they feel disgusted by the prospect.

Good Intentions Are in the Eye of the Beholder: Culture Shapes Perceived Intentionality

by Cory Clark

When determining whether someone did something intentionally, should it matter whether the action had positive or negative consequences? Logically, the downstream consequences of an action should be irrelevant to such judgments, but research reveals that U.S. Americans are far more likely to see actions with harmful side-effects as intended than identical actions with helpful ones.[1]

Consider the following example:

Psychology News Round-Up (October 21st)

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This week on the blog, Anup Gamba discusses why political ideology undermines logical reasoning. Our C&C Posts Not To Miss section includes the answer to the question, is the internet making you mean, explores what we talk about when we talk about morality, and has a timely throwback to judging political hearts and minds.                   

Psychology News Round-Up (October 14th)

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This Week on the Blog

Our knowledge of how people communicate online and the motivations behind it is still in its inchoate stage. Check out this week’s post to see if the internet is making you mean.

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