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How Marriage Gets “Under the Skin” to Benefit Health

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By Brian Chin

Research shows that married people tend to be healthier than both people who have never been married and people who were previously married (i.e., divorced, widowed, or separated). But it’s less clear how or why married people are in better health. Are there biological and psychological advantages of marriage?

Why Your Identity Matters

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“Black people don’t go to therapy, Joan; we go to church.” So says one woman to her struggling friend on the TV sitcom Girlfriends after her friend admits that she wants to find a therapist. This moment captures an important insight: Identities, like race, gender, and socioecomonic status, are linked to health behaviors. The behaviors that people choose to engage in to promote their health are shaped by what identities come to mind and the strategies for improving health that are linked to those identities.

Health Influenced by Social Relationships at Work

Recent research shows higher social identification with one’s team or organization is associated with better health and lower stress. The meta-analysis covers 58 studies and more than 19,000 people across the globe.

Friendships, Vaccines, and Impressions: Upcoming Studies in SPPS

 

While many scientists explore what people have in common, several studies publishing online to Social Psychological and Personality Science show us how differences help us understand individuals.

The company you keep: Personality and friendship characteristics, Michael Laakasuo; Anna Rotkirch, Venla Berg, Markus Jokela

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI April 27, 2018

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This week's roundup covers leadership, future selves, health decisions, and many more topics. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.
 

On the Blogs

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI February 9, 2017

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This week's roundup covers names of diseases, generosity, and what college does people, among other topics. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

On the Blogs

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI August 4, 2017

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

For Health and Happiness, Share Good News

Study of separated and active service member couples finds those who communicate better get benefits of better sleep

San Antonio, Texas – Service members, including both active and recently separated, have been called upon to fight overseas and to assist during natural disasters at home. They can face unique challenges when they return in both the workplace and at home. New research, focused on these service member couples in Oregon, confirms supportive, responsive partners provide a buffer to loneliness and sleep deficits among military couples.

Improving Healthcare by Harnessing the Social Context

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Anyone who has been to the doctor recognizes that medical diagnoses and treatments are embedded in a social context. Patients are influenced not only by what tests are performed and what treatments are suggested, but how the doctor communicates the results of these tests makes recommendations, and engages with patients. How can we use the social context to improve healthcare?

Wealth Doesn’t Always Equal Health

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“Wealth equals health” has been a commonly accepted principle for decades. Beginning in 1967, the classic Whitehall studies revealed that higher-class British civil servants had lower risks of mortality from a wide range of diseases

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