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ethics

How Women and Men’s Different Emotional Experiences Shape Moral Decisions

Image of man and woman sitting on floor, back-to-back, thinking

Negative stereotypes about women’s emotionality have persisted throughout history, leading to many damaging myths about their decision-making capacities in the social, professional, and political sphere.  Historically, women’s emotionality was also considered to undermine their ability to make moral decisions.  Women were often viewed as morally inferior to men because they based moral judgments on emotion rather than logic.  In stark contrast to this early view, we now know that self-conscious moral emotions, like guilt, are critical to moral judgment and moral behavior (

Are Liars Ethical?

Image of Pinocchio wooden toy

By Emma Levine

We tend to think of lying as a vice and honesty as a virtue. For hundreds of years, theologians and philosophers have suggested that lying is wrong. For example, almost six hundred years ago, St. Augustine stated, “To me…it seems certain that every lie is a sin.” The prohibition of lying is deeply ingrained in most major religions and the presumption that lying is wrong leads scholars, parents, and leaders to broadly condemn lying.

Would You Lie for Me?

Image of hand holding a spray paint can near a wall

By Dave Nussbaum

Think it would be tough to convince someone to lie for you or to vandalize public property? Think again. 

Gender Difference in Moral Judgments Rooted in Emotion, Not Reasoning, Study Finds

If a time machine was available, would it be right to kill Adolf Hitler when he was still a young Austrian artist to prevent World War II and save millions of lives? Should a police officer torture an alleged bomber to find hidden explosives that could kill many people at a local café? When faced with such dilemmas, men are typically more willing to accept harmful actions for the sake of the greater good than women.