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Salient Multiculturalism Enhances Minority Group Members' Feelings of Power

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Members of ethnic minority groups face many challenges in their everyday lives, including subtle and blatant discrimination, and, more broadly, threats to their social identity. Efforts to mitigate such problems and promote intergroup equality frequently involve telling people how they should try to behave toward minority group members.

Hidden Advantages and Disadvantages of Social Class: How Classroom Settings Reproduce Social Inequality by Staging Unfair Comparison

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Alice, Marie and Frédérique have been in first grade for 2 months now. Today, their teacher tells them they are going to learn about a new letter and the girls are already impatient. The teacher writes the letter 's' on the board and turns to ask the children: "what sound does this letter make?'' Immediately a small hand goes up. It is Alice’s. Three other hands quickly follow it. Marie and Frédérique, who do not know this new letter, look at the rest of the class as hands go up. They hope they are not the only ones who do not know the sound of this new letter.

Good Intentions Are in the Eye of the Beholder: Culture Shapes Perceived Intentionality

by Cory Clark

When determining whether someone did something intentionally, should it matter whether the action had positive or negative consequences? Logically, the downstream consequences of an action should be irrelevant to such judgments, but research reveals that U.S. Americans are far more likely to see actions with harmful side-effects as intended than identical actions with helpful ones.[1]

Consider the following example:

How Much Does China Smile?

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By Thomas Talhelm

Several years ago, I was traveling in Thailand. They call it “the land of smiles,” and that sure seemed true to me. I remember seeing a passenger on the back of a motorbike make eye contact with me and smile. I smiled back.

Two days later, I landed in Kunming, southwestern China. Thailand had gotten me into the habit of smiling at people, so as I walked in a local market, I smiled at anyone who made eye contact with me. What happened in response is what I’d call confusion, mild negativity, and sometimes a furrowed brow.

The Healthiest Eaters Are the Most Culturally "Fit"

How to be a healthy eater depends on culture. A recent study shows that in the U.S. and Japan, people who fit better with their culture have healthier eating habits. The results appear in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

A Winning Face Depends on the Culture of the Voter

A recent social psychology study shines a light on how cultural differences affect what voters judge and value most in the facial appearance of potential leaders.

Babies Named for Fathers But Not Mothers Reflect U.S. Cultural Ideologies

From Cal Ripkin, Jr., to MLK to Robert Downey, Jr., finding men named after their fathers is easy. Children named after men in the family – with so-called patronyms – are common around the world. But what about matronymns – names for a mother or grandmother?

Rebuffing Racial Insults: How Culture Shapes Our Behavior

The color of our skin or where we come does matter when it comes to how we react to a racist insult.

Young Children Learn About Prejudice by Instruction, Older Children by Experience

For a 6-year-old, one of the most powerful educational tools may be direct instruction, according to new research on how children learn about prejudice.