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attitudes

To Forgive or Not to Forgive? Understanding Self-attitudes After Health Behavior Lapses

Image of checklist with exercise and nutritional goals

Health behavior change is notoriously difficult. If you have ever tried to exercise more often, drink more water, cut back on sweets, or even floss more regularly, you can probably relate to this difficulty firsthand. Some days you get it right and meet your new health-related goals, and on other days you fall short.

How to Overcome Unconscious Bias

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By Jordan Axt

We all have prejudices we're not even aware of—but they don't have to govern our behavior

Strength of One’s Mexican Identity Is Linked to Political Ideology

New research suggests a significant relationship between Latino identity and political ideology. The study, led by a Nevada State College (NSC) psychologist, found that U.S. born Mexicans who were less strongly identified with their Mexican heritage were less liberal in their political ideology. Mexican-Americans and more broadly, Latinos, are the fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S. and an important voting demographic.

Friendships, Vaccines, and Impressions: Upcoming Studies in SPPS

 

While many scientists explore what people have in common, several studies publishing online to Social Psychological and Personality Science show us how differences help us understand individuals.

The company you keep: Personality and friendship characteristics, Michael Laakasuo; Anna Rotkirch, Venla Berg, Markus Jokela

Could There be a Dark Side to a Growth Mindset?

Illustration of two black silhouetted faces looking at each other with the brain highlighted (left brain has a red X through it right brain has a green check mark)

I recently visited a local school in the Bristol area of the UK to talk about an upcoming wellbeing project. As I walked into the head teacher’s office I noticed a poster that detailed a strategy for increasing performance in young students. The centrepiece of that strategy was “Growth Mindset”. At first, I was delighted that brilliant work conducted by an academic in the US (Carol Dweck) had made it all the way across the pond and into this very applied setting. Then, I felt slightly worried.

The Psychology of Social Class

Image of suburban houses clustered very close together

By the turn of the millennium, before the banking crash of 2008 and the subsequent years of economic austerity imposed on citizens by many western governments, there was a view – even among politicians in left-leaning political parties – that class-based politics was no longer relevant. In the words of the UK’s Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, “We are all middle class now.” These words were uttered in 1997, probably encouraged by a rising tide of prosperity that appeared to be benefitting most, if not all, members of society. Twenty-one years later, the world looks very different.

What Happens When We Evaluate Others?

Image of a gloved hand with a pen writing on an x-ray

In the present climate of divisiveness and inter-group hostility, few attitude objects are as topical as other people. How we evaluate others, especially those from different groups (racial, political, class, etc.), can be consequential for a whole host of outcomes. At this year’s attitudes pre-conference, held a day before the official start of The Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) annual convention, attitudes toward other people was center stage.

In Case You Missed It March 24, 2017

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets that might be worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Defending the Statue of Liberty: Understanding Militant Responses to Terrorism

The traditional Southern belief that men must defend their honor is alive and well but not just among men. A new study finds that both men and women in the Southern United States believe in responding aggressively – and sometimes in the extreme – to attacks on the nation.
 
In two studies, researchers sought to measure both individual and regional differences in honor ideology in the United States.