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Can Narcissists Be Moved to Show Empathy?

Researchers at the University of Surrey and the University of Southampton have investigated whether narcissists can elicit empathy for another person's suffering. It has been well documented that narcissists lack empathy, but why is that the case, and do they have the capacity to change that behavior? The research is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Characterizing narcissism

First Ever Full-Time SPSP Executive Director

Presidential Message to the Membership
David Funder, President SPSP
October 2013

Aggressive Behavior Observed After Alcohol-Related Priming

Researchers from California State University, Long Beach, the University of Kent and the University of Missouri collaborated on a study to test whether briefly exposing participants to alcohol-related terms increases aggressive behavior. It has been well documented by previous research that the consumption of alcohol is directly linked to an increase in aggression and other behavioral extremes. But can simply seeing alcohol-related words have a similar effect on aggressive behavior?

Designing the experiment

New Web Editor to Spearhead Improved SPSP Web Presence

Big changes to the SPSP website are coming your way – more blogs, feature stories, and opportunities to share research among personality and social psychologists, as well as with the public.

SAGE Young Scholars Recipients Engaging in Research

Five recipients of the SAGE Young Scholars Award, which is supported by a generous donation from SAGE Publications, are putting

David Hamilton and John G. Holmes Added to the Heritage Fund Wall of Fame

The Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology is pleased to announce that David Hamilton and John G.

How Asian American 'Tiger Mothers' Motivate Their Children

An article titled “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior,” published in The Wall Street Journal in 2011, has continued to provoke a cultural debate among parents after self-proclaimed ‘tiger mother’ Amy Chua asserted that Asian American parenting methods produce more successful children. Researchers at Stanford University delved deeper into Chua’s ‘tiger mother’ approach, and their research sheds light on key fundamental differences in parenting methods between Asian Americans and European Americans.