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Congratulations to the 2015 SAGE Young Scholars Awards Recipients

The Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology (FPSP), in collaboration with SAGE Publications, has announced the SAGE Young Scholars Awards 2015 recipients. The awardees receive a one-time award of $5,000 to be used at their discretion for research, study, or conference travel-related purposes. Five awards are presented each year to young scholars representative of the broad spectrum of personality and social psychology research areas. 
 
"The SAGE Young Scholar Awards recognize outstanding achievements by young scholars who are early in their research careers. The awards are intended to provide these scholars with funds that can be flexibly applied in extending their work in new and exciting directions. Previous winners of this award have gone on to positions of intellectual leadership in the field. Because these awards are highly sought after, winning a SAGE Young Scholar Award is recognition of both accomplishment and potential," shared Harry Reis, President of FPSP.
 
This year's awardees were selected from a large and highly competitive field of qualified nominees. This field provides impressive testimony to the vigor with which innovative research is being conducted by young scholars in social-personality psychology. Their exceptional contributions indicate a bright future for the field.
 
Please join us in congratulating this year's recipients, who will be recognized at the award ceremony during the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in Long Beach, California, February 26-28, 2015.
 
2015 SAGE Young Scholars Award Recipients:
 
Clayton Critcher
 
Clayton Critcher
 
Clayton Critcher is an Assistant Professor of Marketing, Cognitive Science, and Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business. He received a PhD in social and personality psychology from Cornell University in 2010, and an AB in psychology from Yale University in 2005. He works in various areas—self and identity, judgment and decision making, moral psychology, and social cognition—all toward an understanding of how people reason about and behave in ambiguous and challenging social, economic, political, and moral settings. He was the 2014 winner of the Carol D. Soc Distinguished Graduate Mentoring Award.
 
 
Emily Impett
 
Emily Impett
Emily Impett is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. She completed her PhD in Social Psychology at UCLA and completed two postdocs, the most recent at UC Berkeley. Dr. Impett applies and blends social psychological theories of close relationships and sexuality to understand when “giving” to a partner—both inside and outside of the bedroom—help versus harm relationships. Her research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, and the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, and she has received several research awards, including an award for Early Career Achievement from the International Association for Relationship Research.
 
 
Nicholas Rule
 
Nicholas Rule
Nick Rule is assistant professor of psychology and Canada Research Chair in Social Perception and Cognition at the University of Toronto. He received a PhD in 2010 from Tufts University under the mentorship of Nalini Ambady and an AB from Dartmouth College in 2004 where he worked with Neil Macrae. He was the 2013 recipient of the International Social Cognition Network’s Early Career Award and the Ministry of Research and Innovation of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award in 2012. His research focuses on processes and outcomes related to person perception, ranging from micro-level phenomena (brain responses) to macro-level phenomena (cultural differences).
 
 
 
Jenessa Shapiro
 
Janessa Shapiro
Jenessa Shapiro is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Management at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She received her PhD in Social Psychology in 2008 from Arizona State University, working with Steven Neuberg. Dr. Shapiro's research attempts to understand when and why people express vs. conceal prejudices. In addition, she explores the experience of being a target of prejudice, examining topics such as multiple forms of stereotype threat and relations between members of different minority groups. Dr. Shapiro's research has been supported by over $2.8 million in grant dollars from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the John Templeton Foundation, and the Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program.
 
 
 
Jay Van Bavel
 
Jay Van Bavel
Jay Van Bavel is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at New York University. He completed his PhD in Psychology at the University of Toronto and a postdoc at The Ohio State University. Dr. Van Bavel blends theory and methods from social psychology and cognitive neuroscience to study how group identities, moral values, and political beliefs alter our perceptions and evaluations. His research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and the John Templeton Foundation, and received several research awards, including the Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions in Social Neuroscience.
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