You are here

Character  &  Context

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI October 26, 2018

Feature Image

In the news this week, a look at machine intelligence making moral decisions. See what else you may have missed online.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

On the Blogs

Check out more posts from around the web: Social and Personality Psychology Blog Roll
 

In the News

Self-driving car dilemmas reveal that moral choices are not universal  via Nature

High stakes decision-making causes a little more cheating, a lot less charity  via Medical Xpress

Americans are distinguishing between Muslims and terrorists via Pacific Standard

How to capitalize on your team’s diversity  via Scientific American

Binary bias distorts how we integrate information  via Medical Xpress

Why are we so angry? via BBC Radio

Strangers smile less to one another when they have their smartphones  via PsyPost

Mobile communication lab lets any person participate in any study  via Cornell Chronicle

Psychologists discover surprise reason why people stay in unhappy relationships  via Newsweek

First impressions count, new speech research confirms  via Medical Xpress

Tetris: It could be the salve for a worried mind  via ScienceDaily

The wax and wane of ovulating-woman science  via Slate

Three is not good company for women job seekers  via Yale News

I’ll have what she’s having: Books for better sex and better relationships  via The New York Times

How to stop delegating and start teaching  via Harvard Business Review

 

On Twitter







Want to receive the latest content from Character & Context? Sign up for updates direct to your inbox here.

What did we miss? Did you recently complete a media interview, write a post, or have your work featured in the news? Want to be in the next edition? Drop us a note and a link at press@spsp.org. Your contributions keep us engaged.

Blog Category: 

About our Blog

Character & Context is the blog of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP). With more than 7,500 members, SPSP is the largest organization of social psychologists and personality psychologists in the world.   

Learn More ›

Questions ›

Writing Resources ›

Contribute to the Blog ›

Get Email Updates from the Blog