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In the Journals

How to Overcome Unconscious Bias

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By Jordan Axt

We all have prejudices we're not even aware of—but they don't have to govern our behavior

How Marriage Gets “Under the Skin” to Benefit Health

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By Brian Chin

Research shows that married people tend to be healthier than both people who have never been married and people who were previously married (i.e., divorced, widowed, or separated). But it’s less clear how or why married people are in better health. Are there biological and psychological advantages of marriage?

Prospective Motor Control in Infancy Is Related to Inhibition and Working Memory

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By Janna M. Gottwald

Executive functions are processes that help us to focus on what is important, to remember things, and to plan our daily activities. Finding early markers of executive functioning could help researchers develop interventions for children with impaired executive functioning (Diamond, 2013), but early executive functioning and its emergence in infancy are not yet sufficiently understood.

Does Human Nature Include an Emotion Signaling System?

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By James A. Russell

Humans everywhere easily read each other’s emotions from their faces – facial expressions of basic emotions are universally recognized -- or so we are told in our textbooks.  A new series of studies raises doubts about this claim.

Good Intentions Are in the Eye of the Beholder: Culture Shapes Perceived Intentionality

by Cory Clark

When determining whether someone did something intentionally, should it matter whether the action had positive or negative consequences? Logically, the downstream consequences of an action should be irrelevant to such judgments, but research reveals that U.S. Americans are far more likely to see actions with harmful side-effects as intended than identical actions with helpful ones.[1]

Consider the following example:

The Bittersweet Taste of Revenge

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By Fade R. Eadeh, Stephanie A. Peak, & Alan J. Lambert

From the biblical mention of an “eye for an eye” to Inigo Montoya’s desire to avenge his father in The Princess Bride, the act of revenge has captured the interest of humans for quite some time. Given the longstanding history of this topic, one might reason that scientific research has arrived at a consensus on the emotional consequences of revenge. Yet, the emotional ramifications from revenge are fairly complex and are often times contradictory.

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