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In the Journals

Can we Undo our First Impressions?

Image of white woman shaking hands with black man
Imagine that you learn something highly negative about someone new. For instance, say, an up and coming politician is accused of corruption, or a new faculty member is rumored to have sexually harassed studentsFurther, imagine that you find out later that you were entirely wrong. Perhaps the politician’s opponents planted evidence, or the rumors about the faculty member were soundly discredited. In scenarios like these, can we fully cast aside our false first impressions, or might they persist at some level even after we explicitly believe that we have changed our minds?
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Shared Perceptions: Morality is Embedded in Social Contexts

Wordmap of morality
The partisanship and rancor in Washington is aMoral psychology Word Cloud Concept troubling indicator of how different political liberals and conservatives have become. After all, the places we live, the media we watch, and the candidates we vote for have become increasingly polarized. Underlying many of these changes are basic differences concerning the kinds of moral communities we live in, the moral messages we hear, and the moral issues our politicians stand for.
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Women are Underrepresented in Fields that Idolize Brilliance and Genius

Woman in lab coat working on robotic machine

Pervasive cultural associations link men but not women with raw intellectual brilliance. Consider, for example, how difficult it is to think of even a single portrayal of a woman who – like Sherlock Holmes, Dr. House, or Sheldon Cooper – displays that special spark of genius.

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