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In the Journals

Can Marijuana Reduce Social Pain?

Image of a young girl being talked about behind her back

By Timothy Deckman

Marijuana use is hot topic of debate recently. With states legalizing recreational use, more states putting medicinal use up for referendum, and even the NFL reconsidering its disciplinary policy on the issue, it is important for researchers (and data) across specialties to be a part of this debate. This project, published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, focuses marijuana’s ability to dampen social pain among the lonely.

There is less ‘I’ in teams

Image of circle of people reaching in to the center and joining hands

By Mina Cikara

Mina Cikara, Anna Jenkins, and Rebecca Saxe discuss their new research about how moral behavior changes when we’re part of a group. 

A relationship with God?

An image of two pointer fingers touching, creating a burst of white light

By Kristin Laurin

I have relationships with lots of people. I have relationships with my parents and sisters. I have relationships with my friends and colleagues. I have a relationship with my girlfriend. I even have a relationship with the cashier at the Trader Joe’s who doesn’t make me feel bad when all I buy is chips, beer and chocolate peanut butter cups. But do I have a relationship with God? Could I have a relationship with God that bears a psychologically meaningful resemblance to my relationships with the important people in my life?

A Recipe for Replications

Illustration of a man creating his own self portrait illustration

By Mark Brandt

Are Liars Ethical?

Image of Pinocchio wooden toy

By Emma Levine

We tend to think of lying as a vice and honesty as a virtue. For hundreds of years, theologians and philosophers have suggested that lying is wrong. For example, almost six hundred years ago, St. Augustine stated, “To me…it seems certain that every lie is a sin.” The prohibition of lying is deeply ingrained in most major religions and the presumption that lying is wrong leads scholars, parents, and leaders to broadly condemn lying.

Thinking Ourselves Into Eating More

Image of young woman weighing options of a cupcake and an apple

“Think before you act” is sage advice for dieters, especially when considering grabbing that holiday cookie, right? A new analysis of 50 studies finds that thinking before you eat can actually undermine your dieting goals. When we think, we often simply come up with reasons why we deserve that extra piece of pumpkin pie.

Addressing Pervasive Biases in Academia

Image of a diploma and a graduation cap on top of a stack of books

The current requirements for diversity training at universities fall short of addressing the pervasive gender, racial, and ethnic biases in academia.

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