You are here

Community Perspectives

Recruiting Analysts and Co-Authors for a Crowdsourcing Project

Image of a male and female scientist presenting a beaker and molecular structure
By Emily Robinson
 
What happens when multiple independent analysts test the same hypothesis on the same dataset? Do they come up with the same results, or are the results heavily contingent on the specific analytic strategy chosen? If you’re interested in being a part of finding out, you can sign up here to be a data analyst and co-author on our collaborative crowdsourcing project.
 

Social Influence and Teen Sex: What Matters and What Doesn’t

Image of four young boys and girls sitting near one another, all using tablets or phones
By Benjamin Le
 
American parents often worry that their adolescent children are susceptible to their friends’ influence and will be pressured into having sex before they are ready to do so. Are these worries justified?
 
Past research has found that social influence is associated with behaviors such as smoking and alcohol use among teenagers.1,2 A recent study3 extended this work and investigated whether three types of social influence predict adolescent sexual behavior:
 

Changing Mindsets to Raise Achievement

Image of a plant sprouting inside of a lighbulb
By Daniel Greene and Dave Paunesku
 
In this month’s Current Directions in Psychological Science, Stanford’s Greg Walton reviews “wise” interventions that can produce significant benefits in many important domains. Now, a new center at Stanford is working to scale these interventions and implement them in classrooms… and they’re looking for your help.
 

Eco-friendly Poster Option

Image of Visibility and Environmental Behaviors poster
By Cameron Brick 
 
There’s nothing so familiar as boarding a flight to go to a conference and seeing a half dozen passengers get on board with elongated tubes filled with posters. But now there may be a more convenient alternative, and an environmentally friendly one too. Cameron Brick, a graduate student at UCSB, explains more:
 
Dear SPSP colleagues,

The Feeling of Being Stared At

Illustration of a lady's blue eyes and black eyelashes
By David Nussbaum
 
Psychologists Adam Waytz of Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Business and Jamil Zaki of Stanford have a fantastic blog hosted at Scientific American called The Moral Universe in which they discuss the psychology of right and wrong and issues surrounding it. If you haven’t checked it out yet, you definitely should.
 

How do we make moral judgments?

Good and Evil on a scale balancing over a question mark

How do humans make moral judgments? This has been an ongoing and unresolved debate in psychology, and with good reason. Moral judgments aren’t just opinions. They are the decisions with which we condemn others to social exclusion, jail, and even violent retaliation. Given their weight, moral judgments are often assumed to be rational, though recent psychological research has suggested that they may be more like gut feelings.

The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience and the Science of Persuasion

Image of tiles of brain scans

Here's an article titled The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience and the Science of Persuasion generously shared by Jay van Bavel (@jayvanbavel) and Dominic Packer (@PackerLab), originally written for Scientific American's Mind blog, and well worth a read. Here's an excerpt:

Pages